“This is not your country,Resolve Your Personal Issues” -Kasirye Gwanga Asks Museveni-Kagame

Being outspoken and maverick on Uganda’s military and political scene, Kasirye Gwanga is one of 1384 officers and militants who were promoted on March 3, 2018 by the Commander In Chief Gen. Museveni following recommendations of the Uganda Peoples Defence Force (UPDF) Commission Board.

Gwanga, was in the same year officially retired and seems to have had a controversial but colourful military career that started as Staff Sergeant in the Idi Amin regime.

He turned rebel, joining Andrew Kayiira’s Uganda Freedom Army (UFA) that was involved in the bush war to topple Milton Obote before joining the National Resistance Army (NRA) shortly before taking power in 1986

However while attending to a recent interview where he was tasked to give his opinion on the current tensions between Uganda and Rwanda,Kasirye Gwanga says both Museveni and Kagame should solve their differences together and not let it be a problem of the two countries at large.

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GEN KASIRYE GWANGA AGAIN—————————————————Gen: President Kagame and museveni if you have a problem sort ur selves don't waste your time, this country isn't ur's, We fought who are you.Moderator : They are all presidentsGen: Presidents my crap don't tell me about that shit

Posted by Kirya Emmanuel on Tuesday, March 12, 2019

There’s a saying that you must never believe a political rumour until it is denied. The authorities in Uganda have a standard response to any news of tension between Rwanda and Uganda: “there is no fundamental problem between Uganda and Rwanda.” That very statement should warn us that there seems to be a big problem.

Since independence in early 1960s, Rwanda’s Tutsi minority had suffered repeatedly under the majority Hutu population until the military takeover of state power by the Rwanda Patriotic Front (RPF). The Hutu majority had also assumed political power by mobilising against what they saw as a colonial power that favoured the Tutsi minority. Their failure to establish a new order that would transcend the colonial divide and rule policy would haunt them for decades and would continue to cast a shadow into present day Rwanda.

The euphoria of independence unleashed the seeds of latent intolerance and violence which forced multitudes of Tutsis to flee the country. Many fled to Uganda but the Obote regime proved hostile to the Rwandans who sought refuge across the border that has been closed for weeks.

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